TV Review: Killing Eve (BBC One) – Season Two

The follow-up to the critically acclaimed first season of Killing Eve sees the return of bored, desk-bound Eve (Sandra Oh), a British intelligence investigator who is obsessed with capturing the psychopathic assassin, Villanelle (Jodie Comer). Based on the Villanelle novel series by Luke Jennings, this second season sees Eve’s fantasies of being a spy take an even deeper turn, beginning 30 seconds after the final episode of the season one as Eve is reeling at thought of possibly having killed the talented killer, when Villanelle disappears. Now, both of them are in deep trouble. Eve has to find Villanelle before someone else does, but unfortunately, she’s not the only person looking for her.

Overall Series:

A great follow-up to an impressive first season with just as many twists and turns and an equal measure of shocking violence balanced perfectly with comedy and a prominent seductive tension in the air. Although Phoebe Waller-Bridge, head writer on the first season, has taken a step back, there’s still some great writing in this series with many standout lines of dialogue. Eve and Villanelle’s chemistry is what will keep you engaged in this tense cat and mouse chase, but it’s certainly a culture-filled adventure worth keeping up with.

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Episode 1: ‘Do You Know How to Dispose of a Body?’

Kicking off just 30 seconds after Eve stabbed Villanelle in season one, the new series makes it feel like we never left Eve’s Paris apartment. The first episode brilliantly shows the progression and hints at what’s to come. As Eve pleads with a window salesman to talk to her about windows so that she can feel a sense of normality, we also start to see a hint to her madness. This season really could go in any direction.

Episode 2: ‘Nice and Neat’

Julian Barratt is a great addition to the cast in this episode. He’s brilliant, but we’re definitely spurring on Villanelle to kill him in the end. As both sides are gearing up, getting their intelligences together, or maybe just even recovering, the chase is truly about to begin.

Episode 3: ‘The Hungry Caterpillar’

With the return of Konstantin and a great supporting role from Adrian Scarborough, who has taken his place in the meantime, this episode emphasises the fantastic cast and performances. Just like The Very Hungry Caterpillar that the episode is titled after, Konstantin tells Eve that Villanelle is a parasite. He says, “She gets into your brain. She eats you up to make space for herself.” This is how the series works. Like Villanelle to Eve, it gets into your head and eats up your intrigue. And we’re always still hungry for more.

And we’re not the only ones. Eve’s hunger is turning into an addiction. Using an apple as a metaphor for desire and forbidden fruit, we’re really starting to feel the sexual tension in this episode. What does Eve want to catch Villanelle for? Is she just doing her job? Or does she want her all for herself?

Episode 4: ‘Desperate Times’

With Villanelle and Konstantin in Amsterdam setting up their freelance assassin business, Eve and Villanelle are obviously missing each other. They’re both behaving desperately and carelessly. “Desperate Times” are definitely afoot, but what’s it all leading to?

As Niko questions Eve and her distance, she almost kisses Hugo. What’s going on there? Maybe it’s because Hugo seems to be the only one other than Villanelle that really sees her.

Episode 5: ‘Smell Ya Later’

As Eve becomes increasingly more like Villanelle, taking on certain psychopathic or sociopathic tendencies, we finally see the two come together. But the tension seems to be cut short as the focus is put on a somewhat boring subplot which I seem not to have been paying any attention to because I found myself a little lost by the end of this episode. All that I’m left thinking about is Carolyn (Fiona Shaw). What’s her plan?

Episode 6: ‘I Hope You Like Missionary!’

Niko finally confronts Eve and takes a bit of charge, much to Eve’s satisfaction. Eve and Villanelle work together, but as Villanelle says, “The only interesting thing about you is me.” And that’s very much my opinion on the series at the minute. It’s undeniably of a great quality, but it just hasn’t had the effect of the first series so far. We’re all waiting for Villanelle to do something drastic, as Eve also waits for something to happen to make her life more exciting.

Episode 7: ‘Wide Awake’

As Villanelle goes undercover in the company of Aaron Peele (Henry Lloyd-Hughes), Eve turns deeper into the dark side as her fantasies are made real. She’s losing control and her recklessness has become obvious. Wherever next week’s episode goes, will Eve go all the way?

This was a very subtle episode that was rather drama-less compared to the rest of the series so far, but it definitely vamps us up for the finale next week.

Episode 8: ‘You’re Mine’

I’ve not really seen the point in the past few episodes, but it really comes together in this final episode. Eve and Villanelle have both been used, but will it pull them closer together? Will Eve by the murderous sidekick that Villanelle has been moulding her into? Or has Eve realised that this was all too much for her and make a run for it? Maybe the idea of being a psychopathic assassin isn’t all what she thought it was going to be. Maybe she wasn’t ready, after all.

“This is what you wanted,” insists Villanelle. And this is definitely what we all wanted. Chaotic and blood-filled from the get-go, this episode shows off the series’ clever, dark, funny and seductive writing. The series has felt a little lost at times, but this final episode has everything that we loved about the first series.

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About Charlie Morris

Proofreader and film blogger living in Cornwall.

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